To The Point

Welcome to To The Point's Tumblr. Warren Olney's To The Point is following the stories beyond the soundbites. Keep checking back here for curated news and shows.

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Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia on how he gets his news… from New York Magazine

Photo from West Hollywood as gay marriage supporters rally after today’s rulings. More here.

On today’s To the Point,” Warren talked with Andrew Kohut, President of the Pew Research Center about whether younger generations are more supportive of same-sex marriage. Kohut says yes. But in the clip below, Ryan Anderson from the Heritage Foundation and author of the book, “What is Marriage?” disagrees. 

Ahead of the Supreme Court hearings on Prop. 8 and DOMA, gay marriage advocates held a vigil at LA City Hall. More here.  

Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act covers all of nine states and localities in seven others whose histories of racial discrimination in voting led Congress to require them to get federal permission whenever they change voting laws. First passed in 1965, after voting-rights marchers were attacked by sheriff’s deputies in Selma, Alabama, it’s been extended several times, most recently in 2006, with huge majorities in the House and the Senate and the signature of President George W. Bush. Today it was lawyers for Shelby County, Alabama whose lawyers told the court the Act is not just out of date, but unconstitutional. During arguments today, the US Supreme Court was sharply divided. Justice Scalia called Section 5 a “racial entitlement.” Supporters called it as relevant now as when it was enacted. We hear about the arguments, how they were received and the prospects for a decision in June.

Guests:

Andrew Cohen wrote a piece that provides historical context for today’s Supreme Court Challenge to the Voting Rights Act. Read it here at The Atlantic.  

President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the Voting Rights Act of 1965 while Martin Luther King and others look on, August 6, 1965.  
 
On today’s show, we ask: Do we still need the Voting Rights Act? 

President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the Voting Rights Act of 1965 while Martin Luther King and others look on, August 6, 1965.  

 

On today’s show, we ask: Do we still need the Voting Rights Act? 

But past remains present to a disturbing degree in the South. It turns out that states and counties with a history of voting discrimination in 1964 are still trying to suppress the growing minority vote today. Consider, for example, that eight of eleven states in the former Confederacy passed new voting restrictions since the 2010 election.