To The Point

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My worst fear is that we’re going to end up again in some kind of direct or indirect military rule, and this time by the popular cheers and the popular demand of the masses - with the popular support. And that would be even worse that where we were at.
Rasha Abdulla, Associate Professor and former chair of the journalism and mass communication department at the American University in Cairo on today’s To the Point
Given the depths of our partnership with Egypt, our national security interest in this pivotal part of the world and our belief that engagement can support a transition back to a democratically elected civilian government, we’ve sustained our commitment to Egypt and its people. But while we want to sustain our relationship with Egypt, our traditional cooperation cannot continue as usual when civilians are being killed in the streets and rights are being rolled back.
President Obama, speaking today on Egypt. Full transcript here. 
A dead body and other burnt dead members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi lie on the ground around Cairo University and Nahdet Misr Square, south of Cairo August 14, 2013. Photo: Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters
More on the bloody crackdown on today’s To the Point. Listen here. 

A dead body and other burnt dead members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi lie on the ground around Cairo University and Nahdet Misr Square, south of Cairo August 14, 2013. Photo: Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters

More on the bloody crackdown on today’s To the Point. Listen here. 

The apparently miraculous end to the crippling energy shortages, and the re-emergence of the police, seems to show that the legions of personnel left in place after former President Hosni Mubarak was ousted in 2011 played a significant role — intentionally or not — in undermining the overall quality of life under the Islamist administration of Mr. Morsi.
From today’s New York Times: "Sudden Improvements in Egypt Suggest a Campaign to Undermine Morsi"

Mohamed Morsi is no longer Egypt’s president as the military takes over in that country. Egyptian columnist Mona Shadia talked to KCRW’s Steve Chiotakis about what that means for her, and her country. 

Women speak of wild chaos and panic. Faces blur in the madness. Women drift under or with the crowd. Their minds and bodies bear witness to unimaginable cruelty.
The Daily Beast ”Raped in Tahrir: The Frightening Reality Women Face at Egypt Protests”

Part I: 

Egyptian Army Issues Ultimatum as Protests Continue 

Two years ago, millions of street protesters forced Egyptian dictator Hosni Mubarak to step down, and the Army seized governmental control. A year later, Mohammed Morsi became Egypt’s first elected president, but now millions are back in the streets demanding that he step down, and the Army has issued an ultimatum of its own. We hear from Cairo.

Part II:

Secrecy, Diplomacy and Edward Snowden 

Edward Snowden says he went to work for a defense contractor so he could inform the American public about the government’s secret surveillance of telephone and Internet conversations. Having fled from Hong Kong, he’s still thought to be in the Moscow airport. Over the weekend, London’s Guardian newspaper and Der Spiegel in Germany published new revelations that the US has spied on allies as well as enemies. Angry leaders in Europe say that could scuttle a trade deal between the US and the European Union — the biggest ever negotiated. Does the US keep more secrets than it needs to for national security? Should whistle-blowers be prosecuted or protected?

P. J. Crowley, Former Assistant Secretary of State in the Obama administration and professor at George Washington University, joins Warren Olney to talk about how the Arab world must learn a better way than using violence to respond to videos like “Innocence of Muslims.”

In this new era of social media, will the burgeoning democracies in Egypt, Libya, and elsewhere be able to prevent further violence in their countries?

Listen to the full "To the Point" here.

I don’t think that we would consider them an ally, but we don’t consider them an enemy. They are a new government that is trying to find its way.
President Obama responding yesterday to Telemundo host José Diaz-Balart’s question, ”Would you consider the current Egyptian regime an ally of the United States?” The full transcript is here.